Proserpine Museum open for business

13th April 2017 12:28 PM
Peter Harling, Aisla Reinke and Gloria Cowan of the Proserpine Museum and Hostorial Society with the uprooted museum sign post Cyclone Debbie. Peter Harling, Aisla Reinke and Gloria Cowan of the Proserpine Museum and Hostorial Society with the uprooted museum sign post Cyclone Debbie. Peter Carruthers

AISLA Reinke said volunteers were scooping water out of the Proserpine Museum with dust pans following an inundation during Cyclone Debbie.

But the Proserpine Museum is now up and running again.

Ms Renkie said the building had not been damaged structurally in any way and no artefacts chronicling the long and proud history of Proserpine had been damaged.

The main problem is that the museum is struggling to get people through the door.

Usually with the arrival of the cruise ships to Airlie Beach the Proserpine Museum is well supported, but since Cyclone Debbie hit the region group bookings have been cancelled.

Cruise ship passengers prior to the cyclone visited the Whitsunday Gold Coffee farm but since Cyclone Debbie this has not been possible and now the museum is off the passenger visit list as a result.

"We should have a cruise ship in here but they have cancelled because the coffee farm is closed. That is a big revenue raiser for us," volunteer Gloria Cowan said.

Sometimes as many as three bus loads arrive at the Proserpine Museum, hence the scale of the hit.

The Proserpine Museum is open from 9am - 4pm week days and will be open on Anzac Day (April 22) from 1-4pm.

Admission is $6 for adults, $3 for children and kids under school age get in free.

Since a grant was offered to the Proserpine Historical and Museum society at the centenary of Federation in 2001 the facility has been operating from the Bruce Hwy next to the tourist information centre.

In that time it has never been severely affected by tropical cyclones.